Pardin 3 Madeiras Cachaça

Well this will mark a first for the site…..My first Cachaça review. Having visited Manchester Rum Festival in early June, I found myself taken with one particular exhibitor. I met Leszek Wedzicha on the Weber Haus table and was instantly enthralled by his enthusiasm, his knowledge….and his ability to rival Yves on the Amathus table next door for sheer enthusiasm whilst giving a tutored flight through the available range. I picked up a cachaça during the evening whilst still “fresh” and will write about that particular bottle later. But since then I’ve expanded my horizons and I thought that it would be fun to kick things off with this interesting number….a blend.

The beginnings of Pardin Cachaça hark back to a 20-year-old dream to produce a Cachaça that expresses two differing terroirs within a blend. The components for Pardin 3 Maderias are produced in two locations. Within Minas Gerais and within Sao Paulo State. These two locations have been chosen for their differing terroir which influences the cane grown there.

Camanducaia in Minas Gerais is located close to the tourist town of Monte Verde. It has both hot and cold extremes of temperature and is within the Serra da Mantiqueira (Mantiqueira mountain range) at an altitude of 1100 metres above sea level. This altitude is said to favour the growth of sugarcane allowing the location to express itself in the Cachaça. The Pardin Cachaça production in this location utilises controlled fermentation and a 1000 litre steam-heated alembic still.

Camandicaia Distillery Steam Heated Still

Sao Paulo State is a known sugarcane producing region and its heated climate is said to allow cane with a high sucrose content to be grown. The Pardin Cachaça production in this location also utilises controlled fermentation but a 350 litre direct fire heated alembic still is used.

Pardin 3 Madeiras Cachaça – 40% abv – Cachaça

Pardin 3 Madeiras actually uses 4 differing barrel types though two are Oak (Carvalho). At the Minas Gerais distillery, the Cachaça is matured in French Oak, Amburana and Jequitiba. At the Sao Paulo distillery the Cachaça is matured in American Oak. These components are then blended to produce Pardin 3 Madeiras. Age wise, the component of the blend aged in American Oak is a 5-year-old Cachaça, the French Oak, Amburana and Jequitiba all see a maturation period of 18 months. Quite interesting to see established woods utilised in the Rum and Rhum maturation process being blended with native Brazilian woods.

Tasting Notes

Nose: Very pleasant honeyed vanilla sweetness. That beautiful cinnamon of the Amburana that always manifests itself as iced cinnamon buns for me. Spiced pumpkin syrup. Pumpkin pie. Light peppery oak spice. Bakewell tart like almond and sweet marzipan. It has a freshness and vibrancy from the youthful components. Quite a herby note, maybe dill…..and a touch of dried mixed peel

Mouth: A little of sweetness. Lightly spicy oak and an almost savoury roast pumpkin soup note. The oak shows itself way more on the palate as it dries things out. Celery. A definite fennel, dill and fresh herby quality. Like chewing a slice of sugarcane such is the grassy quality. Cinnamon buns appear as the Amburana powers into view. Nutmeg, cinnamon, slightly burnt fruit loaf. Perhaps the finish is where it lets itself down slightly. It has a spice driven finish with hints of caramel, light toasted oak and the vapours carry floral notes…but it’s quite short lived. A very solid Cachaça overall and the skill involved in the blending of differing woods is clear to see.

4 / 5

What an amazing start (for me) on this journey into Cachaça. A very well composed and well-integrated blend that allows the individual qualities of each wood, of which two are native Brazilian, to shine whilst also avoiding one-sided dominance. A nice level of complexity. If I could buy it in the UK, I most certainly would.

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