Worthy Park Single Estate Reserve – Velier 70th Anniversary Edition

This review is kind of an extension to my overview of all three of the Worthy Park Signature Range which you can read all about here. I had no idea that this Worthy Park release was even a thing. One day whilst browsing the pages of an Italian spirits site, this release jumped out towards me. A 57% abv version of the quite fabulous 45% Worthy Park Single Estate Reserve. After a little chat with Zan, it was added to my basket and duly purchased. Eventually (following a little incident with 24 bottles of Ginger Beer), it arrived.

Worthy Park Single Estate Reserve – Velier 70th Anniversary Edition – 57% abv – Pure Single Rum

As with the 45% release, this Rum is tropically aged for between 6 to 10 years. It is made up of 100% WPL Marque (60-119 gr/laa). As with the 45% release, this has caramel colour but has not been chill-filtered. Let’s get to it then.

Tasting Notes

Nose: Beautifully oily. A huge nose. A fair bite and sting of alcohol given its abv. A little air and time allows the goodness to push through. Intense Worthy Park banana. Thick, gloopy molasses….think dipping a spoon into a tin of treacle. Shortcrust pastry mincemeat tarts with a spoonful of stewed apples laced with cinnamon. Black tea and buttered spice bun. Vanilla and a solid undercurrent of oak. Salty olives and preserved lemons. Acetone but not a dominant note. A little kola nut on the back-end. 5 or 6 drops of water opens up a basket of fresh tropical fruit and a gentle creamy custard tart. It also evokes the molasses aroma from a hot distillery tour.

Mouth: Big. Fat. Oily. Very hot initially. It takes over your mouth entirely. You’re powerless to resist. A strong spike of black pepper initially gives way to a drying, moisture sapping oak that grabs your tongue and won’t let go. Salty brine and preserved lemons. Citrus oil drips over the edges of your tongue. The mid-palate is where this rum shines. Flambé banana. A freshly open pack of dried tropical fruit. The bitterness of molasses and soft liquorice. It’s a chewy rum full of chocolate coated banana chips and toffee-like dates. Buttery slices of malt loaf….the kind that sticks to your teeth. Rum and Raisin fudge stuffed into a banana and warmed on the bbq. Added water (bringing it down to about 52-53%) affords you the ability to enjoy a less heated sip that brings the addition of date and walnut cake, lighter molasses and banana pancakes.

I had a slight issue with the finish on the 45%….enough to mark it with the same 4.5 stars as the Marsala Cask Finish as I thought that the Oloroso finish trumped them both. No such issues here. It’s everything that I needed from the 45% and so much more. Very long, warming and peppery. Dry oak, a little cigar leaf. A full spoonful of molasses, liquorice root, walnut and the merest hint of fudge. It just goes on and on. A really beautiful finish for a really beautiful rum.

5 / 5

Worthy Park are pretty much nailing it release after release. It’s all there in this bottle. Including heaps of the trademark Worthy Park banana…..to quote a man far more eloquent than me…..“nobody does banana better than WP which of course is a very good thing because who the fu*k does not love banana”

It’s an exciting (and expensive) time to be embedded in the rum universe.

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements

Kill Devil Hampden 17

Now we have the basis laid down for Hampden Estate with its own bottlings here, we can look to explore some independent releases….of which there are plenty. Kill Devil seem to be in possession of plenty of Hampden Rum as their releases from the distillery are growing in number….particularly on the Cask Strength side with a 24-year-old (which I’ve never tasted), a very small release of less than 60 bottles of a 9-year-old Cask Strength rum which will be coming to this site and a limited edition bottling of a Cask Strength 10-year-old for The Whisky Barrel….which I have on order as I write this. Kill Devil are the Rum arm (Golden Devil in the U.S) of Hunter Laing, specialist blenders and bottlers of single malt whisky. They bottle either at 46% (50% as standard in the U.S with no Cask Strength releases) or at natural Cask Strength….un-chill filtered and with no additions or colouring. They apply their whisky principles to their Rum releases. They really are true single cask releases. The Kill Devil range is Hunter Laing’s showcase of the quality and diversity of rum available in the Caribbean and from further afield.  So without further fuss…let’s dig into this bottle.

Kill Devil Hampden 17 – 46% – Pure Single Rum

Distilled in the traditional twin retort pot still at Hampden Distillery in December 1998, some 11 years prior to the current ownership taking over and 5 years prior to it being subject to a government takeover, this Rum was bottled in 2016 giving it over a full 17 years of maturation. There is an 18-year-old bottling from the same distillation date of December 1998 which I will look at in time.

Tasting Notes

Glass: The pale white wine coloured liquid has one hell of a nose. Even at 46% this is bursting from the glass. Huge. Pungent and typically Hampden….but also a touch Long Pond too in its fruity delivery. Esters esters esters. Acetone. Varnish. Buckets of fruit both ripe and overripe. A clear and definite menthol note. Sweet Victoria pineapples. Ripe strawberry sweetness. Almost perfumed. Pineapple mint. Overripe bananas. Guava juice. Sugared almonds. Olives. Smoked cheese. This is a joy to sit and nose. It just keeps on giving. Beautiful fruit, confectionery, fresh mint and sappy pine notes. Not the funkiest Hampden that I’ve tried, but it’s massively pungent.

Mouth: Sweetness is the vibe initially backed with an amazingly medicinal quality of acetone, varnish and a little pine. The sweetness fades relatively quickly but whilst its there the initial overwhelming note is Pineapple….a lot of pineapple. Grilled and sticky sweet. The fade brings a slightly bitter or more likely sour note…like fizzy sour sweets or a past its best fermenting pineapple. Further refreshers reveal more of that base sweetness….green apples, ginger syrup and a light vanilla. Kola Kubes. Pear drops. The sweet / sour interplay of a ruby grapefruit. Citrus oil appears along with that beautiful sweet and menthol pineapple mint interplay that was present on the nose. There is a lack of any real oak influence in this which probably assists in allowing the fruit to shine through. Savoury notes of olives and brine are present as expected but are nowhere near the dominating flavours. At the back-end I found the finish to be of a medium length and as the sweetness of that pineapple fades it boosts the menthol and pine quality to the fore. White wine. Pomelo with a sprinkling of black pepper and a little clove oil. Surprisingly whisky like too. The finish for me after such a flavour and aroma explosion was quite disappointing and by far the weak link here…..thats because it was so vibrant and giving at the front end. But if you carry on refilling your glass…..you always maintain the sweet spot of those aromas and flavours.

4 / 5

An amazing Rum that for me was a little bit of a let down at the finish line. A more vibrant finish would’ve seen an extra half mark on the score. But if you see this, you should buy it. Money well spent.

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Hampden Estate – Hampden Gold and Rum Fire Velvet

Amazingly this will mark only the second and third rums from Hampden Estate to feature in the site, the first being the quite excellent Excellence Rhum Collection release. I thought it useful to gather some information and give a little background on the Hampden Estate and their history.

Hampden Estate, known for their incredibly pungent pot still output lies in the northwest parish of Trelawny in the Queen of Spain valley and first operated as a large sugar plantation in around 1753. At this time it was owned by a Scotsman by the name of Mr Archibald Sterling. In 1779 the Hampden Great House was built on the Estate with the large ground floor functioning as a rum store until the early 1900’s. 20 years later in 1799 the upper residential level of the Great House was added.

Hampden Estate Great House

Solidly embedded in Jamaican history, Hampden Estate established the Hampden Presbyterian Church in around 1824 making it the first church of that denomination in Jamaica. Under the ownership of Mr Archibald Sterling up until circa 1827, the Estate then came into the ownership of Dermot Owen Kelly-Lawson, Justice of the Peace of Trelawny. Ena Kelly-Lawson, his daughter, married a Mr Farquharson who upon her death inherited Hampden Estate. The Farquharson’s owned and operated the estate as a sugar and rum production facility until financial difficulties in 2003 saw the government operated Jamaica Sugar Company take ownership . So essentially during a 250 year period spanning 1753-2003, the Estate was owned and operated by only two families. The government ownership was also accompanied by the shouldering of an element of debt to help protect local employment. At one time the Estate was renowned to be in possession of some of the best Cane yield lands in Jamaica and boasted the highest tonne of sugar from tonne of cane milled. But due to a perceived lack of investment from the previous owners it was deemed that the estate had become archaic, therefore inefficient and subsequently unprofitable. In 2009 following a legal dispute relating to the estates previous owners, Everglade Farms Limited owned by the Hussey Family acquired the Estate via public auction as a result of a divestment of assets by the Jamaica Sugar Company. A commitment was made by Everglade Farms to invest $6.2 million into Hampden Estate and Long Pond Sugar Factory (not distillery) and this brought with it an element of stability to the Trelawny economy.

As far as the Rum itself goes….Hampden is a treasure trove of goodness. They specialise in the making of heavy Pot Still rums and have in-depth knowledge in the art of making High Ester Rums that can only be gained from experience handed down from generation to generation. Hampden do not use commercial yeast.  They culture, suspend and regenerate their own. They also use that most mythical of creatures….the dunder pit. They’re also still using fermenters made more than 100 years ago. This is centuries old traditional Rum making at its best…..a place that I’d love to visit.

Hampden make a variety of marques ranging from 50 to 1600 Esters. The higher the ester range, the more intense the aroma of the rum. Their rums are used extensively in the blending of other rums throughout the world and their higher ester rums are used by the food, flavoring and perfume industries. Familiar known marque names will be LROK, HLCF, <>H and DOK but there are many more.

Although certain marques are set aside for ageing, the majority of Hampden’s business comes from bulk Rum sales to the likes of E & A Scheer in Holland.

There is plenty of other reading on the subject of Hampden Estate and one of the most in-depth sources can be found here

All of that brings me to the fun subject of  the two Rums that I have chosen to look at today…..Hampden Gold and Rum Fire Velvet.

Hampden Gold – 40% – Unaged – Pure Single Rum

Tasting Notes

Glass: The Rum is a completely unaged pale straw gold. Now do we see the uselessness of categorisation by colour? E150a….Spirit Caramel. In this instance they’re not doing it to dupe you, quite the opposite. It’s being done to combat your preconceptions about unaged Rum. To allow a quality distillate to be experienced by those that would otherwise write it off. They’re not hiding it, however it would be good to have some acknowledgement of this on the label. Initial aromas definitely show us that we’re in pure pot still Jamaican territory. Acetone. Pear drops. Tropical fruit….think papaya and guava. Beautiful bruised bananas. Molasses. A touch of freshly cut green apple. Light sweetness.

Mouth: The Rum has a very thin mouthfeel and carries none of the sweetness present on the nose. It’s very spirit driven. Molasses. A light vegetal, almost agricole like sugarcane note. Fresh, ice-cold apple juice. Lidl Apple Loop sweets. Mixed tropical fruit jam. Dialed down funk. Even though its very light (for a Jamaican) and has a very thin mouthfeel, I enjoy it. It doesn’t have the abv to hammer home what makes its origins great but it could be a gentle introduction to the style and at a good price to display the quality of the distillate even down at 40%. Better to nose than to drink, but solid stuff for their entry-level nonetheless. Great in a rum and coke which is where I use it.

3 / 5

Hampden Rum Fire Velvet – 63% – Unaged – Pure Single Rum

Tasting Notes

Glass: Wild. This is more like it. A huge fruity arrival. It grabs you by the scruff of the neck and screams Jamaican! They use dunder at Hampden…and it shows. Plump ripe strawberries and their fresh candied sweet aroma. Lots of citrus oil. Overripe mashed banana. Green cooking apples. Kiwi fruit. Funky as hell. Really heavy vibrant sugarcane notes. Root vegetables…earthy turnips and parsnips. Something rotten on the compost heap. Stinging acetone. A coating of varnish on a cheap cricket bat. Wax. Brine. Olives. Rather weirdly the aroma of passing the flue of the boiler that exhausts at the side of my house. Slightly metallic. Simultaneously both heavy and light. Beautiful natural sweetness. It’s the Rum equivalent of the state that Newt from Aliens was in when Ripley found her.

Mouth: An oily flavour explosion and way more approachable than I expected. That’s not to say you can dive in. You have to acclimatise. Small sips to ease yourself in. Very hot. Very peppery. Very funky. Pear drops. Acetone. Savoury leads the way with olives, brine and freshly cut fiery ginger. Quite herbal. Very agricole like in its root vegetable quality. The sweetness pushes through on the mid-palate though and its very welcome. The juice from a chewed chunk of freshly cut sugarcane. It’s quite sharp too. Cloudy apple juice and apple purée. Fleshy pears. It has a very creamy and oily mouthfeel…its also really floral. Citrus oils. A drop or two of water really helps open the Rum up and releases Guava jam. More apples. Tropical fruit. Salty crackers. Aniseed sweets. The finish is long, warming and returns to the savoury leading with anise, salty olives and vegetable crisps. Crispy seasoned lotus root. Molasses and that magical vapour that can only be fresh, vibrant Jamaican Rum allows it to finish really cleanly. It’s a brute of a Rum that needs a cautious approach….a bit like a game of Buckaroo….gently gently.

4 / 5

This is pretty much the only distillery produce available on the market in the UK with the USA getting Rum Fire which is a higher ester version of the Velvet. There is no doubting the quality and tradition that goes into the production of these Rums. Both are definitely worthy of a purchase. The aged independent stuff from Hampden Estate for me is where the real fun lies though….and it is those releases that will be getting a run out in the coming months as I’ve a wealth of releases from Habitation Velier, Velier, Adelphi, Blackadder and Kill Devil to choose from. Stay tuned.

Newt

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Habitation Velier Worthy Park Range

Well OK, if we’re being honest it should be the Habitation Velier Forsyths Range as though the distillery name is there, it’s not there where it matters….which is in the large letters adorning the top of the label……yet.

I picked up the first releases in the range early doors when the Habitation Velier concept was introduced and immediately picked up the Forsyths WP 502 and Forsyths WP 151 Proof. This was then quickly followed by the Forsyths WP 2005 when released and the latest addition arrived over UK Rumfest weekend….Forsyths 2006.

I recently published an article about the Worthy Park Estate Signature Range which you can read here……I’d say that its worth a read.

That’s kind of all that there is to say before moving onto actually appraising the Rums…..which is of course why you’re here.

Forsyths WP 502 – Pure Single Jamaican Rum – 57% abv – Un-aged

Firstly the 502 in the name directly relates to the congener level of 502 gr/laa….or in layman’s terms….pungent. This also (as far as marques go) puts it firmly in the WPE category (WPE – Up to 800 gr/laa). This Rum is distilled from a wash that undergoes a 3 month fermentation period to create all of those flavours and aromas that will be extracted in the Forsyths Double Retort Pot Still.

Tasting Notes

Glass: Crystal clear. Very oily. Waxy. Viscous. Initial aromas are all varnish and incredibly powerful acetone. Pear drops. Deep molasses. Creamy, overripe bananas. Natural yoghurt??? There is also an underlying sweetness to the whole affair with Banana Jam. It’s very aromatic with almost floral notes popping up until the brine, olives and coastal notes hit home. It’s incredibly ‘funky’ and unbelievably lovely stuff.

Mouth: Remarkably approachable. Sweet entry initially before the peppery bite and heat build to a crescendo. A creamy, almost milky coffee. Overripe banana which is the Worthy Park trademark. Fresh sugarcane. It’s very agricole like, but in its sweetness…its not really a vegetal Rum. Fresh coconut shavings. Salty. coastal. The finish is relatively short in length but it crams a lot in…..Brine. Olives. Pineapple. Overall it is not as ‘giving’ as the nose suggests but man its massively impressive. Imagine this with 5 years tropical age…Take. My. Money.

4 / 5

Forsyths WP 151 Proof – Pure Single Jamaican Rum – 75.5% abv – Un-aged

This is very much a more intense, higher abv version of the WP 502….best used in mixed drinks…..does go unbelievably well with Ting and makes a killer Daiquiri.

Tasting Notes

I’ll focus this brief set of tasting notes on the additions to the notes found in the WP 502. In the glass there is a very obvious apple turnover and marshmallow along with a real herbal quality (think marjoram). It has hints of Bajan Blackened Spice Mix. In the mouth the molasses is thicker, heavier and almost chewy….though there are lighter moments with vanilla and citrus oil. Cloves and apple juice round things out. I’d love to taste this Rum fresh from the still. That’s the dream.

4 / 5

Forsyths WP 2005 – Pure Single Jamaican Rum – 57.8% abv – 10 years old

This Rum was from the first distillation at Worthy Park Estate in 50 years. It is the WPL marque which is the most commonly aged marque produced by the estate (WPL – 60-119 gr/laa). Distilled in 2005 it sees just over 10 years of tropical age. There was a loss of in excess of 64% due to evaporation during that 10 year period which averages at 6.4% loss per year. Crazy.

Tasting Notes

Glass: Oily. Beeswax. Overripe Bananas. Bourbon Oak. Dulce de leche. Chocolate. Dried tropical fruit. Light acetone. An almost Rye Whiskey spice to it. The ex-bourbon barrels have had a huge impact. Sweet. Lightly medicinal with smoke and leather. Quite floral.

Mouth: Quite astringent from the off. Oily. Warming. Almond milk. Heavy drying bourbon oak influence. Powdery cocoa. Kinder Bueno. Growing sweetness. Fruit and nut chocolate. Dried banana chips. Rye spice. It skirts very close to whisky territory with its spiced oak but stops just short thankfully. A medium length finish that is heavily bourbon oak led….slight cocoa and nut sweetness gives way to dryness. Cigar smoke. This could genuinely be a good Jamaican Rum for a newcomer. Forget the sugary gateway tripe…this is Jamaican enough to give a really solid grounding yet approachable enough to be enjoyable as the pot still is dialed down a touch by the oak. It all plays really well. Nose translates to palate. It gives easily.

4.5 / 5

Forsyths 2006 – WPM – Pure Single Jamaican Rum – 57.5% abv – 11 years old

Distilled in 2006 and bottled in 2017, this Rum carries the WPM marque (WPM- 120-239 gr/laa) so we’re kicking things up a notch here. Aged for a full 11 years in a tropical climate, losses were in excess of 63%.

Tasting Notes

Glass: The closest thing that I’ve had to the sheer punch of LROK without being from that distillery. Oily. Wow. You get that stinging bright acidic fruit note upon first pour reminiscent of so many classic Jamaican Rums. This is a brute. No dunder remember. Time, and it needs time, gives acetone. Heavy stinging acetone. Sharp tropical fruits. Mango. Starfruit. Fruit Salad chewy sweets. A solid medicinal note binds the aromas together. It leads with sweetness, that trademark Worthy Park overripe banana is here in abundance. Banana bread. Sticky ginger cake. Peppery oak brings iodine. Smoked cheese. Brine. Olives. Citrus. Acetone is ever-present with the medicinal, coastal notes. Very deep. Very revealing. Rewarding.

Mouth: It takes over your mouth from the off. Tangy, lip smacking sweetness. Candied tropical fruit peels. Pear drops. Acetone. Spice bun. Dark fruit and spices. An almost sugared almond note. Overripe banana bursts through. Vanilla fudge. Salty liquorice. Growing heat and oak influence. A dry and salty mid palate. Solid, all-encompassing and chewy. It demands your attention. The long finish starts with sharp tropical fruit and creamy mashed banana moving through biting, peppery dryness, earthy turmeric and heat onto brine, acetone pear drops and powdered liquorice root. Molasses right at the back with an almost sherried oak. Best Worthy Park yet……I mean best Forsyths yet……

5 / 5

Worthy Park Estate really are hitting their stride in terms of the Rums that they’re producing. A real quality output from some really great people. Buy all of the above now alongside their flagship Signature Range and you’ll be rewarded with hours of enjoyment and maybe a new favourite Rum producer.

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Duncan Taylor Single Cask Rum – St Lucia 2002 – Cask 5

Duncan Taylor are an independent bottler of (mainly) whisky, and in their own words:

“Duncan Taylor & Company has ownership of one of the largest privately-held collections of rare scotch whisky casks. The company has been “laying down” casks from premium Scottish distilleries for decades and has, in recent years, made its branded products available to whisky connoisseurs throughout the World.

Duncan Taylor has its origins in Glasgow where the company was initially a merchant and broker of Scotch Whisky casks within the Industry. Devotion to the principle of providing only the finest casks to be filled at Scotland’s leading distilleries has been a key feature of the company’s history and this tradition of building an outstanding portfolio of only the finest scotch whiskies is being maintained to this day by the current owners.

When the company moved its headquarters to the North East of Scotland, close to Speyside – Scotland’s largest whisky producing region – it also took the decision to focus on the production and marketing of its own brands and to cease the “brokering” of whisky in cask form to Distillery companies and Independent bottlers.”

They are also celebrating 80 years of business, being founded in 1938.

Duncan Taylor bottle many Rums, mainly at cask strength or close to cask strength. Having whisky as their origin they do not chill filter and they bottle with natural colour. Now I have numerous bottlings from Duncan Taylor spanning Jamaica, St Lucia, Guyana and Fiji. I also have one of their own Caribbean Blends. Up for review today though is one of their St Lucia offerings.

Duncan Taylor Single Cask Rum – St Lucia 2002 – Cask 5 – 52.6% abv

You can have a read of my previous writings on products from St Lucia Distillers here, here, here, here, here, here and here. Phew. Now you’ll be fully versed with St Lucia Distillers, we can continue. As the label states, this Rum was distilled in September 2002 and bottled in September 2013 giving it 11 years of (assumed) Continental age. Bottled entirely from Cask No 5 which yielded 242 bottles, this has been bottled at 52.6% which I can only assume is cask strength. Though others have questioned bottle yield with assumed angel share and assumed barrel size to potentially arrive at a different number insinuating that it may not be cask strength. I personally can’t say I’m too bothered to dig into that. Of note is the fact that this Rum is Pot distilled. Now St Lucia Distillers have 3 Pot Stills, the John Dore I, John Dore II and Vendome. Given the date of distillation of 2002, that would point towards the John Dore I still as it is the only one that was commissioned at that point. It is also the smallest of their batch stills with a capacity of 1500 litres.

John Dore I on the left

Vendome Pot Still centre, John Dore II behind, John Dore I left

Tasting Notes

Glass: The Rum displays as a dark straw gold  in the glass. Heavy. Medicinal pot still. A little diesel and a dose of creosote. All the good stuff. Sticking plasters and antiseptic cream. A hint of menthol and mint. Quite grassy too. Rubber and acetone back up the medicinal quality of the nose and time in the glass allows the merest hint of savoury vanilla and sticky grilled pineapple. Citrus oil. Whiffs of sweet smoke. It has quite a fresh and nuanced nose that gives more and more over time like the merest hint of barrel influence. A brine and salty quality is ever-present and is rounded out with a hint of powdery icing sugar. A few drops of water and half an hour in the glass adds enamel paint and sugarcane.

Mouth: Very heated entry with the smallest and short-lived hint of sweetness in the form of floral wildflower honey before the dryness shoulder barges its way in. Mint. Creosote. Petrol. Oily but not viscous. A thinner mouthfeel than expected but it does cling on, mainly in the vapours. Almond brittle. No really influential barrel notes can be picked up through the peppery heat. Liquorice. Olives and salty feta cheese. If its possible for Rum to morph into a molasses based offering from Guadeloupe mid-palate, this one does. Bringing with it pickle vinegar and ginger puree. A few drops of water push the sweeter elements to the fore with chocolate, dialed down brine. Less mint. More menthol.

Quite a long finish starts out relatively sweetly with the sugary minty residue from the bottom of a poorly made mojito and wildflower honey but again this dries to leave a grassy sugarcane and mild vanilla. Maybe some almonds. The medicinal pot still note announces itself again bringing to mind any number of Rockley ‘style’ Rums…..but for me never hitting the flavourful heights of them.

It is St Lucian Pot Still Rum at its most identifiable from first nosing. It is everything that I like about St Lucian Pot Still Rum. I would love to see more barrel influence that would come with tropical age and although it’s probably completely off the table given the new owners, a release of cask strength tropically aged individual still offerings from St Lucia Distillers would be welcomed with open arms and wallets by the geeky Rum crowd. Its good, almost very good, but it just lacks that light and shade that I think tropical age would offer.

3.5 / 5

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content

Habitation Velier Foursquare 2013 – Pure Single Rum

Whats that you say? Another Foursquare Rum review…..another piece of the jigsaw. This time its a follow-up to its rarer and younger relative the Habitation Velier Foursquare 2015 Pure Single Rum.

You can read about that Rum here…..and just do a search for Foursquare in the search box to find out plenty more about the distillery and its Rums.

Forsyths Twin Retort Pot Still

This Rum was distilled at Foursquare on their twin retort Forsyths (with added Green Engineering whistles and bells) pot still and then matured for 2 years in ex-cognac barrels. As is usual with the Habitation Velier bottles, the information on there is amazingly comprehensive as we’ve been informed that the loss to evaporation in that 2 year period has been >15%, that the rum has not been chill filtered, is natural colour and is released at barrel proof with no dilution. Obviously, it is sugar-free.

Habitation Velier Foursquare 2013 – Pure Single Rum – 64% abv

Habitation Velier Foursquare 2013

Tasting Notes

Glass: The Rum is a pale gold apple juice in colour. Initially there is quite a bit of white pepper. It’s very punchy and up front….its definitely not shy. Immediately I get Rhubarb and Ginger crumble. Oaty and nutty aromas. Mild olives and salty brine. Preserved lemons and a hint of acetone. There is surprisingly not a huge alcohol attack, just a heavy delivery of aromas. Lotus biscuits, vanilla. The Rum is full and very oily….maybe even waxy. A hint of raisins and dried guava pieces. Doing my usual blowing into the glass reveals a beautiful marzipan quality to the vapour. This has only been matured for two years remember…..crazy stuff.

Mouth: A powerful, oily entry wrapped in warmth and sweetness. It is initially quite biting and that brings black pepper and salted liquorice…..maybe even a hint of liquorice root. A little bitterness but some real grip on the tongue, quite a fruity and grassy mid-palate. That oily citrus returns to tease your saliva glands before the anticipated brine and olives bathe your entire mouth. It takes on a savoury quality that sits at the back of your throat with a vegetal note before the vapours give way to peach and dried tropical fruit. The shortish finish is salty sweet caramel, liquorice and even has a mild amount of smoke. Very enjoyable.

After the initial punch you have to keep reminding yourself that this Rum is so young (though with tropical age probably hitting 5 years if it were a whisky) and at such a high abv as once acclimatised it’s even more approachable. It brings the sweetness of a young well crafted Rum, the weight that you expect from batch distillation and the level of flavour that a Rum of this maturity just shouldn’t have…..a nod perhaps to the choice of ex-cognac barrels. Quality french oak used not to gain anything from that famous cognac heritage, but to gain all from the quality of wood. Punchy? Yes. Powerful? Of Course. Approachable? Surprisingly so. Flavourful? Like you wouldn’t believe. Just the remaining taste in my mouth is taking me back to the aromas around the still and that tap that was turned to allow us to experience freshly distilled Rum at Foursquare. I would love to experience this Rum with a few more years on it as it has world domination stamped all over it. Another hit……like we expected anything else.

4.5 / 5

An example of Pure Single Rum that can trade punches with some tasty Jamaicans. Buy this while you can as there is still availability…even in the UK. £85 for a two-year old Rum? It’s so much more than the sum of its years….it offers development, aroma and flavour that some can spend a lifetime failing to achieve. Judge it on its merits and pick it up. It warrants your attention.

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Worthy Park Estate Signature Range

“How the hell has it taken me so long to write something about Worthy Park” is what I asked myself when I looked at the collection of Rums from the distillery that I have on the shelves. Ever present at Rum Festivals globally since around 2015, which is incidentally where I first met Zan Kong and Gordon Clarke. Boutique Rumfest London in 2015. It’s also where I got my first taste of Rum-Bar Gold, Overproof and their amazing Rum Cream. That was their ‘core range’ at the time and kind of has been for a while. Teased with development samples both at home and at subsequent Rum Festivals, we finally got to see what Worthy Park had been working on behind the scenes at last years UK RumFest. But before we get into this……maybe a little background on Worthy Park and their history.

A Brief History of the Worthy Park Estate

The Worthy Park Estate is located at the geographical centre of Jamaica in the Parish of St. Catherine which is in a valley known as Vale of Lluidas (previously it sat in the Parish of St. Thomas but this was later folded into St. Catherine)

Founded in 1670, the Worthy Park Estate was gifted to Lieutenant Francis Price for his services to Oliver Cromwell during the English invasion and capture of the island of Jamaica from the Spanish in 1655. Since 1670, Worthy Park Estate has only been owned by three families. The Clarke Family have owned the Estate for 100 years. Henry Clarke emigrated to Jamaica in 1846 aged just 18 years old. He became an Anglican Minister and founded the Westmoreland Building Society which is now known as the Jamaican National Building Society. Henry was Father to five sons, one of which was Frederick Clarke.

Frederick Clarke

Frederick (current owner Gordon Clarke’s Great Grandfather) purchased the Worthy Park Estate from J.V Calder in 1918 for £44,000. During his period of ownership he took production levels from 250 tonnes p/a to at its peak 1800 tonnes p/a at the time of his death in 1932. Upon his death his three sons, Clement, Owen and George took over the running of the estate. The company has continued to be operated by successive generations of the Clarke and McConnell families who are all descendants of Frederick Clarke’s children. They have seen that continual re-investment has been made in the estate, expanding cane production and improving the efficiency of the sugar factory.

Commercial cultivation of sugarcane began in 1720 and has continued unabated to this day. Rum production at Worthy Park has been recorded from as early as 1741, which makes it the oldest producer still in existence in Jamaica.

Post World War 2 there was an over-supply of Jamaican Rum in the marketplace and as you would imagine, this drove prices down. Because of this reduced value, the Spirits Pool of Jamaica met with the islands distillers and between them an agreement was made to stop Rum production at the facility in the 1960’s. So, some 40 years after it was last in operation, in 2004 a decision was made by Gordon Clarke to begin Worthy Park Rum production again. Rather than attempting to attach the defibrillator and revive the abandoned distillery set-up, Gordon took on the decision to build a modern facility which would have the capability to produce a wide range of marques. Upon their re-entry to the Rum market in 2005, the decision was made to begin selling bulk rum to brokers who would then sell to bottlers. This would give a steady income whilst allowing Worthy Park to focus on building the Worthy Park brand. Rum-Bar White Overproof was the first product to be unleashed upon the Jamaican market. This was then followed by Rum-Bar Gold and Rum Cream. Having credibility at home was a key driver in delaying the presentation of Worthy Park Rums to the masses.

Copyright Nikos Arvanitis – Rum Traveller

Cane, Yeast, Fermentation and Production

Production wise, Worthy Park uses four sites. They own the Worthy Park and Enfield sites, lease Caymanas from the Jamaican Government and lease Tulloch from a private farmer. The main operations which include the Distillery, Sugar Factory and Bottling Facility are all on the main Worthy Park Estate site with the three other locations being solely used for sugarcane cultivation which encourages efficiency and the consolidation of the operational side allows for reduced logistical costs.

Copyright Nikos Arvanitis – Rum Traveller

Worthy Park have in excess of 20 varieties of sugarcane that are harvested with the majority of the fields being dedicated to 3 varieties. They also utilise 3 different yeasts within their fermentation. An activated dry yeast, an isolated proprietary yeast ( taken from one of their sugarcane varieties) and a wild yeast. This wild yeast is cultivated in 4 american white oak pre-fermentation vats. This yeast is developed in a 3 month process which involves molasses, crushed cane stalks, cane juice and ‘special’ ingredients. The yeast is then allowed to develop on its own in these open tanks which are devoid of any temperature control. Worthy Park have 6 fermentation tanks, of which 4 are temperature controlled via a heat exchanger in order to create the ideal temperature for fermentation. The 2 non-temperature controlled tanks are dedicated to the wild yeast fermentation for their high ester distillate and this is a process that can last for between 2 to 3 weeks. So, these various yeast strains and fermentation methods allow Worthy Park to produce a varying number of marques that each has its own code based upon ester count with the most commonly aged marque being WPL.

WPEL – <60 gr/laa

WPL – 60-119 gr/laa

WPM- 120-239 gr/laa

WPH – 240-360 gr/laa

WPE – Up to 800 gr/laa

You’ll note that these levels have been indicated on some of the Habitation Velier bottlings and in certain instances (the 2006) the marque was used on the bottle (WPM)

Production takes place on a Forsyths Double Retort Pot Still…..and what a magnificent beast it is.

I would personally say that bulk Rum sales have mostly been a blessing for Worthy Park. Without releases by bottlers such as Mezan, Kill Devil, Bristol Spirits, Habitation Velier, Kintra, Cadenheads, Ultimatum and Compagnie des Indes the Worthy Park name would not be as well-known as it is. But for every good and honest representation of a very well produced and honest product, there are some that were allowed to use the name that really didn’t treat it with the respect that it deserved….and I’m specifically looking at the Single Cane Estate Worthy Park which was unfortunately released with ‘additions’ by the brand owner Bacardi. This is the downside of bulk rum sales…..you have no controls over what people do and how they present your Rum. A double-edged sword really as additions are the last thing that a pure single rum producer such as Worthy Park would consider.

Anyhow, let’s get back into what we’re here for……the Rum.

Worthy Park Estate Signature Range

We had been waiting a while for Worthy Park to release their own product with the Worthy Park name proudly up front and centre of the bottle. Now we know what they have been busy working on. At the UK Rumfest in 2017 we were lucky enough to try the two main releases that will see their way into the UK Rum market….and also one that wont…but thats why we order online. At the date of publication, none of the Rums are UK available but if you look hard enough they are available online from elsewhere *cough* France *cough*. Within the range there are two cask strength cask finished Rums and one without additional finishing and presented at a more approachable abv. The bottles are heavy, curved, tapered wide shouldered things of beauty with wooden topped synthetic cork closures and its so good to see Worthy Park Estate so prominent on the bottle. It’s almost reflective of a puffed out chest bursting with pride. So without further ado…..

Worthy Park Single Estate Reserve – 45% abv

The Worthy Park Single Estate Reserve is a blend of Rums tropically aged between 6 and 10 years. It is 100% WPL Marque and is aged in ex-bourbon American white oak . It has added caramel colour for batch consistency given that it is the mainstay in the range but it is not chill filtered. It obviously has no other additions. Pure Single Rum. This Rum will see a UK release.

Tasting Notes

Glass: The Rum is a vibrant gold in the glass and is immediately identifiable as Worthy Park. Banana. Spice Bun. Savoury brine and Olives. Time and a little blow into the glass gives freshly cut fennel. Heavy molasses. Whiffs of English Breakfast Tea. Baking apples filled with mincemeat. Bonfire Toffee. Rich Vanilla and an oily citrus. All rounded out with a pleasing acetone note. Glorious.

Mouth: A beautifully sweet entry is accompanied by a peppery bite. That trademark overripe banana is there along with a little funk. Tropical fruit like Guava and Mango. Brine and salty liquorice by the boat load. A little sticky buttered Soreen malt loaf is a very enticing addition. Nutmeg and Allspice chime in. There is a growing heat and peppery kick. Quite a lot of really pleasant heat on the mid palate as the oak begins to take hold and dry things out. It is nice and oily. Quite chewy. Pancakes with mashed banana and golden syrup with a little vegetal bite too. Sticky dates and treacle toffee. The medium length finish is all oak and black pepper initially with just a trace of sweetness. Salty brine and raisins develop and though I don’t say this a lot about Jamaican rum….there is a leathery and almost tobacco quality in the finish. Burnt cigar leaves and Malt loaf round things out. An amazingly pleasurable experience that has totally been worth the wait. The abv probably sits about right too.

Worthy Park Single Cask Selection Series #1 –  Marsala Finish – 60% abv

Worthy Park Single Cask Selection Series #1 – Marsala Finish is again 100% WPL Marque but this time tropically aged for 4 years in ex-bourbon American white oak. It is then shipped (undiluted and unblended) to their partners in Denmark. The Rum is then put into ‘dry’ Marsala casks that were shipped with some liquid in them prior to being emptied and checked for leaks before the Rum was added. No caramel colour and it is not chill filtered. Pure Single Rum. This Rum will not see a UK release.

Tasting Notes

Glass: A slightly darker gold in the glass, the nose is quite astringent up front. The alcohol really shows itself and needs a few minutes to disperse. Prunes. Apricots. Blackberries. Raisins. Quite an apparent oak and a fair bit of smoke. Caramelised BBQ banana and fudge. A pomegranate molasses sourness. Clearly pungent pot still with the brine and saltiness that it brings but this is subdued. It is still unmistakably Worthy Park but with another layer.

Mouth: There is an initial astringent and peppery bite with moisture sapping oak that gives way to a growing sweetness. Overripe banana. Apricots. Blackberries. Red currant jelly. Not quite as oily and all-encompassing as the Reserve. There is some real heat in the mid-palate as the astringent oak makes a welcome reappearance. It’s quite tannic and a little reminiscent of hedgerow fruits. There is a sweet and sour interplay on the sides of my tongue with the sweetness of woody berries being offset by sour tamarind. It invites further sips. The medium length finish is initially led by the alcohol vapours. Once the heat that they bring subsides you are left with a warm, tannic and peppery oak that calmly drifts into berries and a hint of red liquorice. The cask finish is really well-integrated, but I can’t help but wonder what more time would’ve done.

Worthy Park Single Cask Selection Series #2 –  Oloroso Finish – 59% abv

Worthy Park Single Cask Selection Series #2 – Oloroso Finish is again 100% WPL Marque but this time tropically aged for 4 years in ex-bourbon American white oak. It is then shipped (undiluted and unblended) to their partners in Denmark. The Rum is then put into ‘dry’ Oloroso casks that were shipped with some liquid in them prior to being emptied and checked for leaks before the Rum was added. No caramel colour and it is not chill filtered. Pure Single Rum. This Rum will see a UK release.

Tasting Notes

Glass: The Rum is a darkish straw gold in the glass and there is a huge dollop of molasses up front backed up with creamy Caramac bar. A hint of mashed banana and caramelised brown sugar. Rhubarb. There are developing savoury notes with brine and black olives and it appears to be quite salty and reminiscent of crumbled Oxo cubes. It is also a little rubbery and sulphury on the nose……like someone is lighting matches in the next room whilst a car is doing burnouts outside an open window. A growing white pepper and nutty character develops before leaving you with date and walnut cake.

Mouth: This has by far the hottest entry of the three. It opens with quite a distracting heat which gives way to a freshly opened bag of dried raisins and mixed peel. Plump ripe greengages. A really apparent powdery white pepper and burnt paper. Speculoos spread. It has a really astringent mid-palate resplendent with white pepper and a grating of fresh nutmeg atop an egg custard. Hidden within the vapours that play at the back of your throat is a block of pipe tobacco similar to the one that my Grandad used to shred and cut with his penknife. Tannin’s aplenty lead what is the longest and most pleasing finish of all three. Its simplicity and enjoyment at its best. Peppery oak and a real heat are carried through to a tobacco and nut laden finish. If I had to add anything, it would be that I think the Rum needs longer in the Oloroso barrels. It’s almost like a layer on top of the Rum and even though its seen the same time in the barrel as the Marsala, it’s not as well-integrated.

So there we go. The new range has been worth the wait. What makes writing about the Rums from Worthy Park even more enjoyable is that having met Gordon once and Zan numerous times, they’re such nice people that you cant help but wish them every success. If this is their first run at a signature range worthy of the Worthy Park Estate name, the future looks very bright.

I’ve maybe copped out a little with scoring the Marsala and Reserve equally. In my own mind I know that the Reserve is the better product. It’s an amazing representation of what for me Worthy Park is, but with so much more depth than we’ve seen in their own releases thus far. But I was and am so taken with the Marsala Cask with its extra abv and all that it offered, I struggled with the score for a while.

Huge thanks to Nikos Arvanitis and Zan Kong for their help compiling this article.

I hope to one day bring you first hand experience of visiting the distillery……but in the meantime if you would like to read more about Worthy Park and see a few images of the things mentioned above, click on this link.

If you would like to really get deep into the history of Worthy Park then I would suggest purchasing A Jamaican Plantation: A History of Worthy Park 1670-1970

© Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, both written and photographic without the express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Steven James and Rum Diaries Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content